Our deaf toddler is 70% Deaf. 100% Boy!

15 Aug

2 yr old on golf courseI never thought I’d say this but I love hearing aids. I love them. The difference when he has them in is astonishing. He can hear a little bit without them but when he loses one, dips them in hoummous or goes to the swimming pool I suddenly realise what a massive difference they make.

I rarely take him swimming. Partly because he’s the third child and the thought of fighting to get his clothes off and on and then stand shivering in a pool doesn’t really appeal. Partly because his big sisters go to swim club training about three times a week so I spend my life beside swimming pools. Partly because hearing aids just complicate matters.

On holiday in Spain my naive hope that he would wear his aids to the pool and we’d just take them out when he wanted to go into the pool was dashed on the first day when he hurled himself towards the pool without warning…and without armbands. An hour later we had purchased armbands and removed his aids but then faced the additional problem of disciplining him when he couldn’t hear us. My cries of ‘careful!’ when he ran round the edge of the pool, ‘stop!’ when he tried to hurl himself into the deep end and ‘share!’ when he snatched some poor childs toy away from him were entirely lost in the silence. I think he rather liked it. Not being able to hear a nagging parent can’t be a great loss. I hated it. I hated it even more as the week progressed and I was conscious that I was continuing to say the same things (particularly the sharing bit) purely for the sake of the other parents.

I don’t really notice his hearing aids any more. When I met someone who took her child to the same toddler group I tried to describe my son and was describing him as blonde, loud and the size of a small giraffe long before I thought to describe him as the one with hearing aids. As soon as I did she knew who I meant immediately.

Because he couldn’t wear his aids at the pool we kept him in the apartment more than we would have otherwise. Our holiday rule is no TV but strangely the iPad seems a less offensive alternative so he sat happily on the balcony, magic ears in, watching Mr Tumble minus the usual background noise of our chaotic family as a result of which his vocabulary increased dramatically. His pronunciation of ‘app-le’ is the cutest thing I have ever heard.

Our next holiday of the summer was the day after he turned two at the end of July. We went on our annual pilgrimage to the Island of Islay where water didn’t pose nearly such a problem. Apart from the fact that he refused to dip a toe into the icy water for the duration of our stay he also has a pathological fear of sand so while his sisters were jumping on the dunes and playing in the rocks he was running around the cottage saying ‘moo’ to the cows in the field behind and doing a ‘digger!’ shout every time the tractor drove past.

It’s definitely a boy thing. I have attended the Islay Show for my entire life, the last 11 with children when the focus has been on bouncy castles and sweetie stalls. This year my primary focus was the sheep and cows (‘baa’ / ‘moo’) followed by the digger (‘digga’) stand where my 2 year old insisted on sitting on every piece of agricultural machinery on offer. I was rather pleased with the introduction, it transpired that the digger stand offers the most generous hospitality of anyone at the Show and while the rest of my family were paying through the nose for candyfloss I was eating strawberries dipped in white chocolate courtesy of W & M Currie & Son.

The following day we were at the Machrie Golf Course for the final round of a major competition. As the finalists stood on the first tee ready to take their first shot my two year old struggled from my arms and ran across the fairway. Scooping him into my arms I got him as far as the first green before he was off again, thankfully running backwards and spinning around the pin at the fourth rather than the first which would have substantially affected the competition. The gallery following the golf weren’t sure which was the more entertaining.

He had his hearing aids in the for the whole time in Islay (apart from the incident with the hoummous) and words started coming thick and fast. Our wonderful Teacher of the Deaf had introduced me to an iPad app called Sound Touch which shows animals and vehicles and their associated sounds. In Islay it was as if the app had come to life. Everywhere he looked there were sheep, horses, ducks, dogs, cows, cats and birds. We watched the plane land at the airport every day, tractors and quad bikes go past the cottage and on our final day he could barely contain his excitement as he watched the cars drive on to the ferry then a lifeboat appear alongside with a helicopter hovering above it and shouted ‘helicopter!’.

It’s funny how you can go to the same place on holiday year after year but have a different experience every time. I’m loving the new boy world he has introduced me to and had to stop myself shouting out ‘digger’ as I cycled past one on the way to work this morning.

Our two year old may be 70% deaf but he’s 100 % boy and with the aids in he is no different to his contemporaries. Except possibly more physical. More funny. More handsome. More cute … and more scared of sand.

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One Response to “Our deaf toddler is 70% Deaf. 100% Boy!”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. ‘Don’t leave us!’ – Continuity of Care | Sleepless in silence in suburbia - September 20, 2013

    […] Therapist left fairly quickly to be replaced by a lovely girl just back from maternity leave. The Teacher of the Deaf was with us from day […]

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